top of page
1.png

The Anti-Racism Roadshow & Happy Hour

The Great B.C. Anti-Racism Roadshow is a first of its kind initiative to convene - in person - with BIPOC citizens, First Nations, Resilience B.C. Anti-Racism Network Spokes, faith communities, local politicians, and key stakeholders across the province of B.C. 

Quick Links:

Destination: Whistler

Destination: Chilliwack

Destination: Lillooet

Destination: Victoria 

Victoria (2).png

Destination: Whistler

We wanted to thank the representatives from Resilience B.C.'s Hub and Spoke Network in the official launch of the Great B.C. Anti-Racism Roadshow in Whistler! We loved spending time with Mohammed, who is not only a passionate and caring person, but incredibly knowledgeable about Whistler and the community there. 

We were also honoured to meet with Mayor Jack Crompton in his beautiful city. He joined us for both the official relaunch of Friday Prayer services for Whistler's Muslim community at the Maury Young Arts Centre, as well as for the first convening of the Anti-Racism Roadshow. His team, especially Erin Marriner, were very receptive and helpful in arranging the meetings. 

On June 25th – June 27th we held our first Anti-Racism roadshow in Whistler. We convened with Mayor Jack Crompton, the local Resilience B.C. Spoke (The Whistler Multicultural Society), faith community representatives, and the First Nations of Squamish and Lillooet. 

We collected information regarding on-the-ground realities faced by minorities in the hospitality industry, the challenges they face, as well as the incredible support and welcome they receive. We also connected with the Squamish-Lillooet Cultural Centre (SLCC) Youth Ambassador Georgina Dan. At the SLCC the youth group we brought learnt about the culture, faith, history, and beauty of Indigenous culture and peoples.

We're convening racial and faith communities and the Whistler Spoke (Whistler Multicultural Society) as the first step of the Roadshow. They will also be hosting the "Anti-Racism Happy Hour (Coffee/Tea) at local cafes to build bridges between individuals and BIPOC/Religious minorities. Current facilitators include the Resilience B.C. Anti-Racism Network, Municipal Governments, The BC Muslim Association, and the First Nations.

Destination Whistler

Destination: Chilliwack

On June 30, 2021 a wildfire broke out near the town of Lytton, British Columbia. Since then, the fire has destroyed most of Lytton as well as the surrounding area. Lytton is inhabited by a majority of the Indigenous Nlaka'pamux people. The estimated population of the Nlaka'pamux is around 1,500 in number. The wildfire displaced the entirety of the Indigenous community as well as the residents of the town.

 

Several interfaith groups, charities and NGOs have committed to assisting the people of Lytton and the Lytton First Nations community in rebuilding and securing immediate aid (food, shelter, clothing etc.). Together, we have raised $35,450.02 to support the community. 

Lillooet (2).png

Contributing organizations include the BCMA, Human Concern International (HCI), the International Development and Relief Foundation (IDRF), Islamic Relief Canada (IRC), the Muslim Food Bank & Community Services (MFBCS), and convened by Foundation for a Path Forward.

 

On Friday, July 16th at 9:30AM at the Chilliwack city hall, we presented the funds raised in a ceremony with Chief Janet Webster of the Lytton First Nation, representatives from the supporting organizations, and representatives from the Resilience B.C. Network, Chilliwack Community Services. The local branch of the BCMA, the Chilliwack Islamic Center, will be hosting this event, and officials of the branch will be joining the ceremony.

 

About Foundation for a Path Forward

Foundation for a Path Forward is the Official B.C. Faith Community Convener, working in partnership with Resilience B.C. They take a start-up mindset to developing innovative and impactful solutions to support anti-racism initiatives, cultural programs, technological innovation, environmental protection, gender equality, youth development, refugee support, and mental health resources in B.C. and across Canada.

About BC Muslim Association (BCMA)

The BCMA is the largest Muslim organization in British Columbia. They are a 55-year-old organization with 17 branches across the province, supporting not only the Muslim community with cultural and religious support, but also the general public with humanitarian and cultural outreach.

 

About Human Concern International

HCI delivers life-saving aid to millions of people crippled by crisis, HCI is committed to sustainable development. This commitment allows us to maximize the impact of your donations by taking a holistic approach to development rooted in empowering the communities we work in.

 

About Muslim Food Bank & Community Services (MFBC)

The Muslim Food Bank programs serves the needs of clients who have special dietary needs (halal, kosher, vegetarian, vegan, etc.). Their client base demographic is predominantly Muslim from all ethnicities. However, they are non-denominational and try to serve families from all faiths and cultural communities.

 

About International Development and Relief Foundation (IDRF)

IDRF (International Development and Relief Foundation) is a Canadian registered charitable organization dedicated to empowering the disadvantaged people of the world. IDRF provides effective humanitarian aid and sustainable development programs, without discrimination, based on the Islamic principles of human dignity, self-reliance, and social justice.

 

About Islamic Relief Canada

Islamic Relief works with communities to strengthen their resilience to calamities, and they provide vital emergency aid when disasters occur.

 

About Resilience B.C. and the Chilliwack Community Services

The Resilience BC anti-racism network offers a multi-faceted, province wide approach in identifying and challenging racism. The program will connect communities with information, support and training they need to respond to, and prevent future incidents of racism and hate.

Destination: Chilliwack
Destination: Lillooet
Lillooet.png

Destination: Lillooet

As part of our continuing work to addresses the root causes of individual and systemic racism, our team was in Lillooet, B.C. as part of the Great B.C. Anti-Racism Roadshow. The roadshow is a direct effort to combat racism and discrimination at the local level, educate allies and stakeholders, share learnings, and build real world anti-racism networks. During the roadshow we:

  • Heard from 10 community leaders in Lillooet.

  • Introduced Resilience B.C. to 5 local community organizations and support groups.

  • Convened 8 different faith groups with one another, many for the first time.

  • Formed a new relationship with the Stl'atl'imx Tribal Police – the only Indigenous Police Service in B.C.

  • Spoke with 30 members of the public during the Anti-Racism Happy Hour

  • Compiled “What we heard” reports regarding community resilience and racism in Lillooet.

We wanted to thank you for representing Resilience B.C.'s Hub and Spoke Network in the official launch of the Great B.C. Anti-Racism Roadshow in Whistler! Tariq and I loved spending time with Mohammed, who is not only a passionate and caring person, but incredibly knowledgeable about Whistler and the community there. 

We were also honoured to meet with Mayor Jack Crompton in his beautiful city. He joined us for both the official relaunch of Friday Prayer services for Whistler's Muslim community at the Maury Young Arts Centre, as well as for the first convening of the Anti-Racism Roadshow. His team, especially Erin Marriner, were very receptive and helpful in arranging the meetings. 

From July 29th – July 31th we brought the anti-Racism roadshow to Lillooet (our first two events took place at Whistler and Chilliwack in June and July). In Lillooet we convened with the First Nations Chief, the local Friendship Centre, the Quaker community, the Japanese community, Tribal Police, and other faith/IBPoC community representatives.

 

Together we learnt about the culture, faith, history, and beauty of T’it’q’et culture and peoples as well as the history of immigrants and settlers in Lillooet. Part of this history was the gold rush, the influx of Chinese and American peoples, and the relationships between many different people. There was also the difficult history of Canada’s Japanese Internment Camps during World War 2.

 

We collected information regarding on-the-ground realities faced by minorities in the region, and the challenges they face, as well as the support and welcome they receive. We connected with Miyazaki House Society - whose co-founder brought our youth group to visit the site of the Japanese Internment Camp located in Lillooet.